Installing Concrete Palisade Fencing For Increased Security and Resale Value

Concrete Palisade

Concrete Palisade fencing has been used historically in the construction industry, particularly in coastal areas as a means of privacy. In essence, these horizontal beams are affixed at regular intervals along two parallel rails, affording protection from the elements. These horizontal pales also come in various sizes, typically up to around 3m in width.

Generally, these fence systems are constructed with a steel or iron frame, which is then covered with either asphalt or concrete. Additional reinforcement may be added as per individual requirements, but it is normally comprised of steel rods. The Palisades are then set firmly in place using either welded or bolted headrail systems. As a result, the concrete palisade fencing system can be incredibly robust, even though it is constructed to last only for a mere 24 mpa of force against it.

This performance data was attained over an extended period of time, which will demonstrate its sturdiness. Additionally, this steel structure has an extremely high degree of fire retardancy, despite the fact that it is simply constructed. The Concrete Palisade Fencing system is also designed to provide exceptionally high levels of insulation - an essential factor in the high cost of heating and cooling in coastal areas. Surprisingly, this same wood-reinforced plastic material actually performs rather poorly in this test, demonstrating the need for further research. Dos and Don'ts When installing Concrete Palisade Fencing There are a number of dos and don'ts to follow when installing this very effective material.

One of the most important things to keep in mind when installing Concrete Palisade Fencing is the way it is structured. Although you may initially think that installing two horizontal railings will give you the best line of sight, be warned that this is not the case. Ideally, you should install your Concrete Palisade Fencing in such a way that there are two horizontal railings. In order to achieve this, you should have two horizontal railings running parallel to each other and directly opposite each other - in other words, one at each corner.

This may seem like an insignificant detail when it comes to the actual Concrete Palisade installation but make no mistake - this is an important detail and should not be ignored. Furthermore, if you live in an area that experiences high winds during the winter months, then you should also install Concrete Palisade fencing over the steel guttering to protect the gutters from damage caused by ice and snow. Always remember that if you do not install the Palisades correctly, you can easily find yourself having large, unattractive, and expensive holes torn out of your fence. This is something that nobody wants to happen and therefore it is crucial that you spend some time learning more about the construction process so you do not end up damaging your fence.

The second major benefit of installing Concrete Palisade fencing comes in the form of the increased security it provides your home. Thieves tend to avoid areas that are adorned with large fences or those which appear to be very secure. Therefore, installing a large concrete palisade will increase the security around your property by a great amount. This added level of security will help to ensure that not only are you protecting your home, but you are also increasing the resale value of your property. There are many fencing companies that will offer a competitive quote for Concrete Palisade and this is something that you should consider carefully before opting for a particular supplier.

Concrete Palisade Fencing Benefits

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