Country Wide Walling

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What Paints Can You Use on Concrete?

paints can use concrete

Though you can use any paint onplaster primer concrete, some kinds prove better suited for certain types of concrete surfaces. Learn which finishes will prove most resilient on concrete floors, statues and walls, or finish failure will prove possible. Learn how to condition the concrete for adhesion, or no type of paint will prove durable in the long run.

Concrete Walls

  • Ordinary latex paint is well-suited for interior concrete walls. Use an eggshell or satin latex paint on concrete walls that aren't exposed to much duress. For concrete walls within weight rooms, work rooms and kids' play rooms, choose a semi-gloss latex paint that will resist stains. If you plan to paint exterior concrete walls and fences, use an exterior acrylic paint that will hold up to ultraviolet light and harsh weather conditions.

Considerations

  • No type of paint will adhere to improperly-prepared concrete. Prime vertical concrete surfaces, or the paint will eventually chip. Use a latex primer on interior walls; use an acrylic primer on exterior walls. Smooth horizontal concrete surfaces do not require a primer; however, they will reject paint unless they are treated with an acid etch.

Contact Country Wide Walling today for a free quotation or more information.

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5 Pro Painting Tips Every Amateur Should Know

propaintingtipssynd

The goal of every painter is to paint neatly and quickly. Fortunately, there are dozens of tricks, shortcuts and trade secrets devoted to painting, many more than for any other home-improvement activity.

The goal of every painter is to paint neatly and quickly. This can be challenging. My neighbor recently spent an entire week painting his bedroom, and ended up with nearly as much paint on himself as on the walls and ceiling. And in the end, believe or not, his wife decided she didn't like the color. He's now spending most of his time outside working on the lawn. Fortunately, there are dozens of tricks, shortcuts and trade secrets devoted to painting, many more than for any other home-improvement activity. Listed below are my five favorite painting tips, gleaned from years of personal painting experience and by watching pros on many job sites. Try one or all of the following techniques and I'm sure you'll end up with a paint job nice enough to show off to the neighbors.

1. Tint the Primer

Whether you're painting interior walls or exterior siding, a coat of primer is key to obtaining professional-looking results. This goes for previously painted surfaces as well as raw wood and new drywall. Unfortunately, most homeowners never bother with primer, which explains why they end up with blah-looking paint jobs. Primer serves three main functions: First, it blocks stains and resinous knots from bleeding through; second, it provides one-coat coverage for the paint topcoat; most importantly, it improves adhesion, which greatly reduces blisters and extends the life of the topcoat.

To further enhance the coverage of the topcoat, try this pro tip: Tint the primer toward the finished color by mixing a small amount of topcoat paint into the primer. (Be sure the primer and topcoat are both latex-based or both oil-based; never mix coatings with dissimilar solutions.) This will greatly enhance the ability of the topcoat to hide the prepped surface completely, especially when painting a lighter topcoat over an existing darker color.

2. Invest in Canvasdrop cloths

I used to buy cheap plastic drop cloths to protect the floor from paint spatters. At the end of the job, I'd just roll up the paint-smeared sheets and toss them out. Then I noticed that pro painters always use canvas drop cloths. When I found out why, I made the switch. Here are just a few of the benefits of canvas:
Canvas drop cloths are durable, and rip- and puncture-resistant. They lay flat as you walk across them, presenting less of a tripping hazard; seldom, if ever, must you tape canvas to the floor. Canvas also absorbs paint drips, unlike plastic drop cloths that become slippery when spattered with wet paint. You're much less likely to pick up paint on your shoe soles from canvas. Canvas drop cloths can easily be folded around corners and doorways--something that's virtually impossible to do with plastic sheeting. Plus, canvas can be reused countless times. I always felt bad about discarding plastic drop cloths after just one use, but reusing them was messy because the dried paint drips and splatters would flake off and get all over the room. Several years ago I bought a 10-oz canvas "runner" that measures 4 ft wide x 15 ft long for about $16. It's perfect for lying on the floor against the wall or spreading outdoors over shrubs and flower beds along a foundation wall. Now, I've never had paint soak through my drop cloth, but you can buy plastic-lined canvas drop cloths that offer better soak-through protection.

3. Roll With a Pole

When painting rooms, forget the ladder and get a telescoping extension pole for your paint roller. Extension poles come in various sizes, but one that extends from about 18 in. to 30 or 36 in. offers plenty of reach for painting rooms with ceilings that are 9 ft or lower. There are also extra-long extension poles that telescope up to about 18 ft for painting cathedral ceilings and loft spaces.

To attach the extension pole to the paint roller, simply thread it into the hole in the paint-roller handle. Check to be sure your paint-roller handle has a threaded hole in its end; most of them do. The shaft of the pole telescopes out and can be locked anywhere along its length with a twist of the wrist.
When shopping for extension poles, look for one that has a soft, nonslip rubber grip and a rigid metal core. And be sure the threaded end of the pole is metal, too. All-plastic handles are too flexible, making them hard to control, and the plastic gets fatigued over time and can snap under pressure. Also check to be sure the telescoping shaft locks securely in position and doesn't collapse when forced.

paint buscket4. Paint Off a Grid

When it comes to poorly designed hardware items, it's hard to find one that matches the futility of the paint-roller tray. Here's a device meant to hold paint for paint rolling, but it spills easily, only holds a small amount of paint, is hard to carry from one spot to another, and is difficult to clean. Plus, you must place the tray on the floor, where someone--okay, me--invariably kicks it or steps in the paint.

I stopped using paint trays years ago, and have never regretted it. Now I roll paint directly from a 5-gal bucket using a paint grid, which is a rectangular, rigid metal screen that hooks onto the rim of the bucket. Start by filling the bucket about halfway with paint, then hang the grid in the bucket. Now dip half of the roller sleeve into the paint, and roll it against the grid to remove excess paint, which drips back into the bucket. At the end of the day, just drop the grid into the bucket and snap on the lid.

5. Record the Color

After painting a room, it's important to keep track of the brand name and color of the paint used, so you can buy more when it comes time to touch-up or repaint the room. I've tried a few techniques to remember paint information, including recording it in a notebook, which I promptly lost, and writing it on the side of the leftover paint cans, which I'd eventually toss out along with the information. I've since found a better way:

Before replacing the light-switch covers and electrical-outlet covers in a newly painted room, I write the vital information (brand name, paint color, paint number) onto a piece of masking tape and stick it to the back of a switch plate. And there it'll stay until it's time to repaint, when it'll be discovered by me, or--with any luck--the next homeowner

For a free quotation, please contact Country Wide Walling today.

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How to Paint a Concrete Wall

exterior wall paintPainting a concrete wall can spruce up an area or make it blend in with the rest of the area's décor. However, there are some things to consider when painting a concrete wall. You must choose the appropriate type of concrete paint, determine if the wall is sealed from moisture and apply primer prior to painting the wall. Use these tips to paint a concrete wall.

Step 1

Choose paint for your project.

  • Select paint appropriate for your outdoor project. You will need a paint that is resistant to moisture and sun exposure. Outdoor concrete paint is available for outdoor projects. However, an oil-based paint also may work for your needs.
  • Pick a paint for your indoor paint project. Basement concrete paint is available in many paint and home improvement stores, however you also can use an interior acrylic paint for the project.

Step 2pressure washer

Clean the concrete wall. For exterior projects, use a power washer to rid the wall of all dirt and dust. If your project is indoors, scrub the wall with soapy water and a scrub brush instead of using a power washer.

Step 3

Repair any cracks or blemishes in your wall with concrete patch. Follow the directions to mix up the concrete patch mixture. Fill holes and use a trowel to smooth the patch to match the surface of the wall.

Step 4

Check the wall for moisture. Paint applied to a wall that is not properly sealed will not adhere properly.

  • Tape plastic sheeting to the wall. Attempt to get the sheeting as air-tight as possible.
  • Check the plastic after 24 hours. If moisture appears within the plastic, you will need to seal the wall. If no moisture is present, the wall is already sealed

Step 5

Seal the concrete wall. Roll on 1 coat of concrete sealer and allow it to dry overnight. Concrete sealer is available at most hardware or home improvement stores.

Step 6

Apply 1 coat of concrete primer. You can use rollers or brushes to apply the paint. Ensure the primer is applied evenly, whichever technique you use. Let it dry for 24 hours. If you can see the wall through the primer, apply 1 more coat.

Step 7kids and pet

Paint your wall with concrete paint. Paint should be applied in at least 3 thin layers. The paint may be sprayed on, rolled on or painted on with a brush. The paint should not be streaky or show brush strokes. Allow to dry for 24 hours.

Step 8

Roll on concrete paint sealer. Cover with 2 coats, allowing it to dry between coats. Paint sealer helps the paint to adhere to the wall and last longer

Tips

  • Keep pets and small children away from your painting project. The fumes can be harmful to them. Additionally, they may rub up against your wall while you are painting it.
  • Wear appropriate safety equipment, such as gloves and goggles.
  • Make sure the area in which you are painting is well-ventilated. Concrete paint, primer and sealer have strong odors.
  • Wear old clothes to paint your concrete wall. Paint used for this project is likely to stain your clothes.

If you would like a free quotation, please contact Country Wide Walling today

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Should I paint over my worn out fencing or gate?

Outdoor maintenance can make your home more welcoming,worn metal fence and it can make a big difference to the value of your home and the surrounding properties. If you have a fence and a gate around your property, it’s important to maintain the structure so that it will last and add to value of your home.

So how do you take care of a metal or timber fence or gate when it gets old or worn out and begins to rust or flake?

Your first thought might be to give it a fresh paint job so that it looks new again on the outside. Painting over rust or wood rot, however, is a very temporary fix that may only last up to one season before the rust and flaking resurface. Painting will not solve the problem. If you notice rusting or flaking, the metal or timber under the paint has worn out. Not only will your fencing look unattractive on the outside, but it will no longer be providing a protective barrier to your property as the material will be easily breakable.

So the answer to the question ‘Should I paint over my worn out fence or gate?’ is generally ‘No’.

When it gets to this stage it’s important to replace the worn out material in question, rather than using a temporary fix to solve the problem. Over a few seasons of repainting you will end up spending a considerable amount anyway, so why not address the underlying problem right away and save in the longer-term?

Go with powdercoating

When replacing the fencing or gate we would recommend going with a powdercoated steel orpowdercoating palisade aluminium option. Powdercoating is a method of treating and colouring metal that’s made to last for years, and particularly when paired with aluminium which is resistant to rust, the replacement fence and gate will be an extremely long-term investment.

What if I change my mind about my powdercoating colour?

  • Powdercoated fencing and gates are built to last so long that the reality is the reason you’ll want to update them won’t be because they’re worn out, but because you fancy a change of colour! So what happens if you want to change the paint colour on your powdercoated fencing? 
  • Painting over a powdercoated fence is absolutely possible and doesn’t have to be challenging – just follow these tips:

Choose a well ventilated area

paint and brushIf your fence is already installed and you’re painting with a brush, you’re all set: your fence is already outdoors. But if you’ve chosen to spray paint you might prefer to take your fence apart and paint it in pieces to avoid getting spray paint on your lawn or the footpath. If this is the case leave the garage door open while you paint inside, or lay down sheets in the garden and do it out in the open.

Clean the surface prior to painting

The best way to clean powdercoated fences is with a basic all-purpose cleaner. You may gently use steel wool to remove grease or dirt that won’t come off. It may be easier to clean a section of the fence, and then paint that section before moving on to the next section so that the surface is freshly cleaned when paint is applied.

Is priming necessary?

No, another benefit of having a powdercoated metal fence or gate is that it does not require any priming to paint over it like a rusty metal fence would.

Paint with spray paint or a brushspraypainting palisade

Spray painting is usually the easiest way to paint a fence or gate, but it must be done outdoors or in an extremely well ventilated area. Spray paint looks like freshly powder coated steel or aluminium when it’s finished, and only requires the painter to follow the instructions on the can. Usually, brush painting is a second option when spray painting is not feasible, or when the area for painting is not as well ventilated, but it can also be used to create the look of a grain in the fence or gate. Make sure to choose paint that is safe for outdoor use

For a free quotation, please contact Country Wide Walling today.

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Tips Before You Start Painting

paint brushes

1. Buy only enough paint to do the job.
Recent studies have shown that between 10% to 15% of paint bought by householders remained unused at the end of a paint job.

2. You don’t have to wash your brushes out between applications.
Water-based paints: Store brushes and rollers in plastic bags between coats

Solvent-based paints: Store brushes and rollers underwater and when ready to re-use, roll or brush water out on scrap newspaper which can be put out with your household waste

Please contact Country Wide Walling for a free quotation, or to discuss your walling needs

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