Country Wide Walling

Country-Wide-Walling-Manager

5 Pro Painting Tips Every Amateur Should Know

propaintingtipssynd

The goal of every painter is to paint neatly and quickly. Fortunately, there are dozens of tricks, shortcuts and trade secrets devoted to painting, many more than for any other home-improvement activity.

The goal of every painter is to paint neatly and quickly. This can be challenging. My neighbor recently spent an entire week painting his bedroom, and ended up with nearly as much paint on himself as on the walls and ceiling. And in the end, believe or not, his wife decided she didn't like the color. He's now spending most of his time outside working on the lawn. Fortunately, there are dozens of tricks, shortcuts and trade secrets devoted to painting, many more than for any other home-improvement activity. Listed below are my five favorite painting tips, gleaned from years of personal painting experience and by watching pros on many job sites. Try one or all of the following techniques and I'm sure you'll end up with a paint job nice enough to show off to the neighbors.

1. Tint the Primer

Whether you're painting interior walls or exterior siding, a coat of primer is key to obtaining professional-looking results. This goes for previously painted surfaces as well as raw wood and new drywall. Unfortunately, most homeowners never bother with primer, which explains why they end up with blah-looking paint jobs. Primer serves three main functions: First, it blocks stains and resinous knots from bleeding through; second, it provides one-coat coverage for the paint topcoat; most importantly, it improves adhesion, which greatly reduces blisters and extends the life of the topcoat.

To further enhance the coverage of the topcoat, try this pro tip: Tint the primer toward the finished color by mixing a small amount of topcoat paint into the primer. (Be sure the primer and topcoat are both latex-based or both oil-based; never mix coatings with dissimilar solutions.) This will greatly enhance the ability of the topcoat to hide the prepped surface completely, especially when painting a lighter topcoat over an existing darker color.

2. Invest in Canvasdrop cloths

I used to buy cheap plastic drop cloths to protect the floor from paint spatters. At the end of the job, I'd just roll up the paint-smeared sheets and toss them out. Then I noticed that pro painters always use canvas drop cloths. When I found out why, I made the switch. Here are just a few of the benefits of canvas:
Canvas drop cloths are durable, and rip- and puncture-resistant. They lay flat as you walk across them, presenting less of a tripping hazard; seldom, if ever, must you tape canvas to the floor. Canvas also absorbs paint drips, unlike plastic drop cloths that become slippery when spattered with wet paint. You're much less likely to pick up paint on your shoe soles from canvas. Canvas drop cloths can easily be folded around corners and doorways--something that's virtually impossible to do with plastic sheeting. Plus, canvas can be reused countless times. I always felt bad about discarding plastic drop cloths after just one use, but reusing them was messy because the dried paint drips and splatters would flake off and get all over the room. Several years ago I bought a 10-oz canvas "runner" that measures 4 ft wide x 15 ft long for about $16. It's perfect for lying on the floor against the wall or spreading outdoors over shrubs and flower beds along a foundation wall. Now, I've never had paint soak through my drop cloth, but you can buy plastic-lined canvas drop cloths that offer better soak-through protection.

3. Roll With a Pole

When painting rooms, forget the ladder and get a telescoping extension pole for your paint roller. Extension poles come in various sizes, but one that extends from about 18 in. to 30 or 36 in. offers plenty of reach for painting rooms with ceilings that are 9 ft or lower. There are also extra-long extension poles that telescope up to about 18 ft for painting cathedral ceilings and loft spaces.

To attach the extension pole to the paint roller, simply thread it into the hole in the paint-roller handle. Check to be sure your paint-roller handle has a threaded hole in its end; most of them do. The shaft of the pole telescopes out and can be locked anywhere along its length with a twist of the wrist.
When shopping for extension poles, look for one that has a soft, nonslip rubber grip and a rigid metal core. And be sure the threaded end of the pole is metal, too. All-plastic handles are too flexible, making them hard to control, and the plastic gets fatigued over time and can snap under pressure. Also check to be sure the telescoping shaft locks securely in position and doesn't collapse when forced.

paint buscket4. Paint Off a Grid

When it comes to poorly designed hardware items, it's hard to find one that matches the futility of the paint-roller tray. Here's a device meant to hold paint for paint rolling, but it spills easily, only holds a small amount of paint, is hard to carry from one spot to another, and is difficult to clean. Plus, you must place the tray on the floor, where someone--okay, me--invariably kicks it or steps in the paint.

I stopped using paint trays years ago, and have never regretted it. Now I roll paint directly from a 5-gal bucket using a paint grid, which is a rectangular, rigid metal screen that hooks onto the rim of the bucket. Start by filling the bucket about halfway with paint, then hang the grid in the bucket. Now dip half of the roller sleeve into the paint, and roll it against the grid to remove excess paint, which drips back into the bucket. At the end of the day, just drop the grid into the bucket and snap on the lid.

5. Record the Color

After painting a room, it's important to keep track of the brand name and color of the paint used, so you can buy more when it comes time to touch-up or repaint the room. I've tried a few techniques to remember paint information, including recording it in a notebook, which I promptly lost, and writing it on the side of the leftover paint cans, which I'd eventually toss out along with the information. I've since found a better way:

Before replacing the light-switch covers and electrical-outlet covers in a newly painted room, I write the vital information (brand name, paint color, paint number) onto a piece of masking tape and stick it to the back of a switch plate. And there it'll stay until it's time to repaint, when it'll be discovered by me, or--with any luck--the next homeowner

For a free quotation, please contact Country Wide Walling today.

  1045 Hits
Country-Wide-Walling-Manager

Painting Tips

paint tips

Paint Tips, Tricks, Techniques & Expert Advice

  • All unpainted surfaces must ALWAYS be primed.
  • Prior to painting your walls a new colour, it is important to paint a white basecoat beforehand. Especially when your original colour is yellow!
  • It is essential to paint a white background on your painted or raw plaster wall when painting up colour samples for the true colour. It is highly recommended that a Primer or Undercoat be used (depending on whether it’s a new or painted wall). Having painted your colour samples you have selected, allow the colour to settle for at least 2 to 3 days and view the colours at different times in the day.
  • All lighting (including natural sunlight and artificial light) affects the colour of your paint as do shadows in a room.
  • A “tint” is when you add white to a colour and a “shade” is when you add black.
  • Colours that sit opposite each other on the colour wheel are complimentary e.g. red and green, whilst monochromatic colours are colours that work well with each other and are harmonious.
  • Stir paint with a flat-surfaced paddle to mix it properly.
  • Sand in a circular motion to provide the most adhesive surface possible.painting wall
  • A reflective sheen finish in a small room with low light will have the same effect!
  • Pre-wet plants or any vegetation to protect them before removing paint outdoors.
  • A Matt finish has the effect of making a small room with lots of light appear larger.
  • Sand between coats of varnish when varnishing wood to remove any exposed fibres.
  • Clean and rinse walls with Polycell Sugar Soap before applying a primer or top coat.
  • Multi-Surface Primer contains no lead, chromate, or other toxic ingredients.
  • Universal Undercoat can be thinned with maximum 10% of Mineral Turpentine.
  • Use a canvas dropcloth to cover flooring or carpets. Canvas is the better option as it won’t puncture or rip.
  • Make any necessary repairs, such as filling cracks, etc., well in advance, so these have time to dry thoroughly.
  • Make sure to cover and protect surfaces such as skirtings, woodwork and windows by taping off with masking tape.
  • The primer coat improves the adhesion of subsequent coats of paint to the specified surfaces, once they have been cleaned and primed.
  • Sugarsoap is a neutral, all-purpose cleaning agent that can be used to clean carpets, tiles, baths, toilets and cars and can even be used to unclog drains.
  • Paint walls from right to left if you’re right-handed (left to right if you’re left-handed) so that you don’t place your free hand on the wall when applying more paint to a brush or roller.
  • Does your newly-painted room still smell of paint? Ensure that the room has enough ventilation to aerate, otherwise one trick is to place saucers of vanilla essence in all four corners of the room.
  • If you don’t like the colour of your pine, stain it in a dark teak methylated spirits-based stain before you mix a white glaze.
  • If you’re working on pine or wood with a grain, sand with 120-grit sandpaper from top to bottom.
  • Before you start, check the condition of the surface you want to paint. There may be various surface problems, such as cracks.
  • Never paint over a problem! Browse through the common problems section of this website and follow the solutions provided.
  • Once you have checked your surface always remember, preparation comes first. Find your surface in the surface preparation section of this website and prepare accordingly before you paint.
  • To determine what kind of paint (water-based or solvent-based) was previously used on a surface, conduct a test patch on a small area using a cloth and methylated spirits. If the coating is removed then it is water-based; if no paint is removed then it is solvent-based!
  • Identify your surface and the corresponding products that can be used on it.
  • Choose your product according to its quality, the benefits you require, and its all-round match to the task at hand.
  • When deciding to tile first or paint first, this will depend on personal preference. Our advice would be to tile first and allow the tile cement and grouting to completely cure. Then cover the tiles with drop-sheets and masking tape before painting. It would be much easier to cover a floor when painting than to cover walls while doing the tile work.
  • Whether an existing paint coating is water-based or oil-based, the sheen level influences the preparation and paint system. New paint coatings do not adhere to any existing coating where there is sheen. For example, if you have an existing coating of water-based Double Velvet and would like to apply a new coating of the same, sanding of the sheen to a flat  / matt finish would be required.

Please feel free to contact Country Wide Walling today for a free quotation on all your walling requirements.

  947 Hits
Country-Wide-Walling-Manager

How to Paint a Concrete Wall

exterior wall paintPainting a concrete wall can spruce up an area or make it blend in with the rest of the area's décor. However, there are some things to consider when painting a concrete wall. You must choose the appropriate type of concrete paint, determine if the wall is sealed from moisture and apply primer prior to painting the wall. Use these tips to paint a concrete wall.

Step 1

Choose paint for your project.

  • Select paint appropriate for your outdoor project. You will need a paint that is resistant to moisture and sun exposure. Outdoor concrete paint is available for outdoor projects. However, an oil-based paint also may work for your needs.
  • Pick a paint for your indoor paint project. Basement concrete paint is available in many paint and home improvement stores, however you also can use an interior acrylic paint for the project.

Step 2pressure washer

Clean the concrete wall. For exterior projects, use a power washer to rid the wall of all dirt and dust. If your project is indoors, scrub the wall with soapy water and a scrub brush instead of using a power washer.

Step 3

Repair any cracks or blemishes in your wall with concrete patch. Follow the directions to mix up the concrete patch mixture. Fill holes and use a trowel to smooth the patch to match the surface of the wall.

Step 4

Check the wall for moisture. Paint applied to a wall that is not properly sealed will not adhere properly.

  • Tape plastic sheeting to the wall. Attempt to get the sheeting as air-tight as possible.
  • Check the plastic after 24 hours. If moisture appears within the plastic, you will need to seal the wall. If no moisture is present, the wall is already sealed

Step 5

Seal the concrete wall. Roll on 1 coat of concrete sealer and allow it to dry overnight. Concrete sealer is available at most hardware or home improvement stores.

Step 6

Apply 1 coat of concrete primer. You can use rollers or brushes to apply the paint. Ensure the primer is applied evenly, whichever technique you use. Let it dry for 24 hours. If you can see the wall through the primer, apply 1 more coat.

Step 7kids and pet

Paint your wall with concrete paint. Paint should be applied in at least 3 thin layers. The paint may be sprayed on, rolled on or painted on with a brush. The paint should not be streaky or show brush strokes. Allow to dry for 24 hours.

Step 8

Roll on concrete paint sealer. Cover with 2 coats, allowing it to dry between coats. Paint sealer helps the paint to adhere to the wall and last longer

Tips

  • Keep pets and small children away from your painting project. The fumes can be harmful to them. Additionally, they may rub up against your wall while you are painting it.
  • Wear appropriate safety equipment, such as gloves and goggles.
  • Make sure the area in which you are painting is well-ventilated. Concrete paint, primer and sealer have strong odors.
  • Wear old clothes to paint your concrete wall. Paint used for this project is likely to stain your clothes.

If you would like a free quotation, please contact Country Wide Walling today

  1126 Hits
Country-Wide-Walling-Manager

How To Paint a Fence

paint fence

Pick a suitable day to do the painting. Certain weather conditions are ideal for fence-painting. Pick a day with no rain in the forecast. Ideally, paint on a day with calm winds and ample cloud cover. Breezes can kick up debris that can stick to your paint job; direct sunlight makes the paint dry too fast and saps its protective properties.

Decide how you want to paint a fence.

Long fence:

  • If you have a long fence, you probably will want to use an industrial spray gun to complete the job quickly. Aim lengthwise, along the grain of the wood. Spray downwind and wear a respirapallisade fence painttor. Be sure to cover plants to protect them from overspray. Always keep a brush handy, even if you opt for a sprayer, in case you need to do any touch-up work.

Short fence:

  • If you have a smaller project, you probably can complete the job using a roller on flat surfaces and a brush for detailed, hard-to-reach sections.

  • Wrought iron fence:  Because they're often intricately designed, it's best to paint iron fences by hand to get optimum coverage. A single heavy coat of enamel or automotive epoxy paint usually is enough

For a free quotation, or to discuss your requirements, please contact Country Wide Walling today

  139 Hits